Our Oscar Reviews on Skipi.tv

With hours before the Oscars, here are some of our skipi.tv reviews and/or discussions of nominated films:

TONI ERDMANN:

CJ Reviews ‘Toni Erdmann’

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA:

CJ Reviews ‘Manchester By The Sea’

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC:

CJ Reviews ‘Captain Fantastic’

JACKIE with Paul Byrnes:

‘Jackie’ Review

HELL OR HIGH WATER with Paul Byrnes:

‘Hell Or High Water’ Review

LA LA LAND with Paul Byrnes:

‘La La Land’ Review

HIDDEN FIGURES with Miriam Capper:

‘Hidden Figures’ Review

Hidden Figures

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**** (out of five)

You’d need to have a cold stone heart – or, I suppose, prejudicially racialist views – to dislike Hidden Figures, the true story of black women working as “computers” at NASA in the 1960s. It’s a wonderful, rather incredible story, full of triumphant moments and performed by a perfect cast.

Yes, these highly talented mathematicians were called “computers” – before we called machines computers – because they made computations, in the same way accountants account and actors act. Not all of the details of the story are this revealingly accurate – the white characters, for example, are all composites of real people – but the astounding and goosebump-inducing achievements made by the three central characters are all historically cOrr ect and profoundly inspiring.

Empire’s Taraji P. Henson plays the central character, Katherine G. Johnson, a bona-fide math prodigy-genius who rose to essential prominence during the “space race” and beyond. She’s terrific, and more than ably supported by Octavia Spencer as Dorothy Vaughn and Janelle Monae as Mary Jackson, both of whom also delivered major damage to ceilings for black people and women within this bastion of astronomical ambition.

Theodore Melfi directs unobtrusively, letting the story and performers shine, but admirably restrains from underlining, and thus undermining, the story’s Big Moments. Like its fellow nominee for Best Picture at the Oscars, Lion, this is the tasteful version of a story that could have been ruined by a heavy hand, a bombastic score or too many studio notes. The true story is monumental enough.