Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich

Survivor Sarah Ransome.png
Survivor Sarah Ransome.

Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich is another in an ever-growing line of excellent Netflix true-crime documentary series. Over four episodes, the show features moving interviews with many of Epstein’s survivors, law enforcement officials, journalists, lawyers and copious footage of Epstein’s world – the houses in particular – to paint a clear and vivid portrait of a monstrous predator and the system that enabled him. Many, many photos of Epstein with Donald Trump give the show an additional creepy edge. It’s very well done, tasteful and well-modulated, and a total binge. Even if you’ve read “all the articles”, as I felt I had, there is still great value in meeting the victims and seeing their provenance; Epstein preyed on the vulnerable, and Filthy Rich does a great job of contextualising the predator’s method of identifying and manipulating their prey.

The focus is on the subset of survivors from Epstein’s first wave of abuse, in Palm Beach in the 2000s, and the series is respectful of them, and thank goodness, because they’ve been exploited enough. Their lawyer, and the original Palm Beach Chief of Police, emerge as dogged, and humble, heroes. A few more survivors from later years emerge as the episodes progress, and by the end we’ve gotten to know them well. It’s their story, really, rather than Epstein’s.

We know how his story ends, and the show doesn’t attempt to push past that. Conspiracy theories are not the subject here, nor detailed accusations against a worldwide consortium of bad men (although Prince Andrew gets royally served), nor do we find out where in the world might Ghislaine Maxwell be. Those documentaries will inevitably follow. This one is probably all you really need.