Only The Animals

* * *

Opens Thursday January 21 in Australia.

Dominik Moll’s Only The Animals is very pretty to look at, pretty fun and pretty ridiculous. If you approach it with the right attitude, it will deliver a solid couple of hours of entertainment.

An “everything-is-connected” film along the lines of Crash, Babel and Amores Perros, Moll’s wintry drama bends over backwards to make the connections. As such, it is contrived to the point of parody. But, despite the tone and performances being very straight-faced, the film works if you allow it in as a black comedy, a joke, or at least a shaggy-dog story. These films need contrivance; this one is more contrived than most; accept it and enjoy the ride. I did, even if a couple of the coincidences really did make me groan out loud.

Centered around the appearance of a dead body in a rural community, and spreading itself across a wide swathe of themes including the effects of isolation and grief, internet fraud, obsessive attraction and stalking, mental illness and – bien sûr – adultery, Only The Animals appears hugely ambitious, but it really comes down to a few central performances, most notably that of Denis Ménochet. Having menaced us in Custody (and other films), his deft portrayal here of a man obsessed with an online lover plays sneakily with his established persona. It’s the kind of trick the film needs to work, and, despite its clearly rickety narrative machinery, it does, just.

Dawn Raid

* * * 1/2

Dawn Raid is a relentlessly entertaining feature length documentary about the rise, fall and re-birth of Dawn Raid Entertainment, New Zealand’s first and, by far, most influential hip-hop label. Anchored by interviews with Dawn Raid founders Danny “Brotha D” Leaosavai’i and Andy Murnane, and featuring almost all of the label’s most important artists including Savage, Mareko, Deceptikonz, Adeaze and Aaradhna, the film has multiple moments of sheer fist-pumping joy.

Dawn Raid was always more than a label; it was a South Auckland cultural force, and the film is about culture and community as much as it is about music. But boy, the music is good; if nothing else, Dawn Raid may open your eyes to a whole area and era of hip-hop that bridges clear US rap influence with specifically NZ Polynesian concerns.

Murnane gets the most screen time, and he tells the Dawn Raid story with great energy, passion, humour and humility. He and Leaosavai’i met at ‘Business School’ – technical college – and the constant refrain of trying to marry a love of music with by-the-book business methodology culminates in a superb second-act comic, and cosmic, pay-off. This is a hip-hop movie with no guns nor gangsters, and the only drug on display is a reefer smoked by an American rapper. Instead, there is humour, joy and a whole lot of heart. It’s a delight from start to finish.

Small Axe

How much do you know about West Indian life in London from the 60s to the 80s? If not much, not enough, or not at all, Steve McQueen (Hunger, Shame, 12 Years a Slave and Widows) is here to rectify that. He’s made five feature films for the BBC, all stories based on actual events, covering daily life for the London Caribbean community throughout those decades. It’s a monumental achievement that gives English Blackness its greatest popular entertainment exposure, I would suggest, ever. All five are now available on Foxtel in Australia.

The films have no recurring characters and are solely linked thematically, but McQueen hascurated them in a particular order and I suggest you follow it. The first two are the best, so if you only want to dip your toes, you can enjoy them and move on. But watching all five has a cumulative power; this is indeed a case of the whole adding up to more than the sum of its parts.

Mangrove: The first in the series and the second best. A relatively conventionally constructed courtroom drama, made unconventional by its dramatic ingredients: the Black London community that the whole series shines a light on. The proprietor of the Mangrove restaurant in Ladbroke Grove is continually harassed by the police; when he and his community demonstrate, they are brought up on charges which they fight in court. The most ‘historically educational’ of the series and a true eye-opener. Also the longest at a smudge over two hours. * * * 1/2

Lovers Rock: The best one. In a little over an hour McQueen offers a massive slice of young West Indian cultural life in London in the 1980s. Two people meet at a house party. That’s it. But it’s so much more: a film about music, mating, toxic masculinity and predator culture, Rastafarianism, sexuality and sensuality (this is the most sensual film of, say, the decade?), youth, food, dance, safe space and above all, community. The most artful of the five, bordering on experimental, it’s joyous, enthralling and magical. This is the one you’ll watch twice. * * * *

Red, White and Blue: The true story of a young man who joined the London police force and became the literal poster boy for minority recruitment, while dealing with the realities of racism within the force, this 80 minute entry features an excellent central performance from John Boyega.  My fourth favourite. * * *

Alex Wheatle: The least satisfying entry is a character study based on one of the writers McQueen engaged in a ‘writer’s room’ designed to generate material for the series. This is the one that suffers the most from Foxtel’s lack of having Closed Captions available for this series: the patois is dense and deep and I have to admit to being unable to follow a lot of it (and clearly missing a lot of nuance and humour). If you have Closed Captions available to you in your viewing region, and you aren’t up on your Caribbean patois, turn them on. * * *

Education: My third favourite is a charming hour-long depiction of a seminal year or so in McQueen’s own childhood, when he got shunted off to a school for “special needs” students. Touching, warm and possessing the most humour of the five. * * * 1/2

SERIES OVERALL:

* * * *

The Dry

* * * 1/2

Releasing across Australia on New Year’s Day.

Robert Connelly’s The Dry, based on Jane Harper’s novel, is a very professionally constructed example of a very trope-y genre. A Big City Cop is called back home to their small town because of a tragic event, and in doing so, must face dark secrets from their past. Sound familiar? Of course it does. There have been at least sixty TV series made in Europe over the past ten years – over forty of them in the Nordic nations – that hew to that exact formula. It’s become such a cliché that there was even an entire parody series, Fallet, made in Sweden in 2017, that hit every tired beat again and again, exposing the genre’s self-cannibalisation ruthlessly.

But Australia is not Norway, and it’s the milieu that gives The Dry what freshness it has. Eric Bana’s Aaron Falk is a Federal Police Officer living in Melbourne whose (fictional) hometown, Kiewerra, hasn’t seen rain in a year. It is the parched, incessantly dusty drought-stricken crisis that gives the film its striking and foreboding atmosphere, and separates it from all those similar stories set in snow and sleet rather than dirt and desert.

The plotting is tight and, of course, the town is full of dodgy dirtbags played by good actors with interesting faces. Bana’s Falk is quite a cipher at the centre, but that’s part of the genre, too: the cop is inherently the least interesting character. It’s all plot plot plot, red herrings and ominous music, until the Big Reveal(s) in the third act. For me, those concluding sequences were not as satisfying – nor as well constructed – as the investigation that came before, and had a nasty bite that seemed tonally distinct from the rest of the film. But I suspect fans of the genre will find this very solid film way more than acceptable. I have no doubt that there was talk of turning the novel into a series; that it’s all done and dusted (sorry) in two hours rather than stretched out to ten is commendable.

Crock Of Gold: A Few Rounds With Shane MacGowan

* * * *

Opens in Australia December 17.

Among music documentarians, Julien Temple strides as a charming colossus, primarily because of The Great Rock And Roll Swindle, his incredible 1980 portrait of The Sex Pistols. He’s also one of the great – and prolific – music video directors, particularly of the British scene since 1977, when he got his start making videos for the Pistols. He’s got an eye, an ear, and a deep appreciation for his tribe, particularly the punks, the rebels and the misfits. Shane MacGowan, creative driving force and lead singer of The Pogues, is certainly all three of those and then some. In his life-long commitment to unhealthy living, he’s perhaps the most misfitting, rebellious punk of them all.

Temple’s two-hour documentary on MacGowan, Crock of Gold, is as energetic and meticulous as all of his work, astonishingly full of expertly curated archival material and found footage, narrated, stirringly and slurringly, by MacGowan, who may be slow and sloppy, but is still somewhat witty and somewhat wise. He’s in a wheelchair now, his feet and brain ravaged by drink, and his head lilts to the side, as though his neck was, too. To get him to tell us his story, Temple has him sit with his wife Siobhan (he got married last year), Gerry Adams (yes, that Gerry Adams, president of Sinn Féin until 2018) and Johnny Depp (yes, that Johnny Depp, who is one of the producers of the movie and seems to venerate men like MacGowan and the late Hunter S. Thompson, guys with real drinking problems). MacGowan talks to them, and Temple illustrates his oral history as he has in previous films with imagery from a vast array of sources and specifically created animation. It’s propulsive and vibrant. There’s a lot of footage of MacGowan from the late 70s during the birth of London punk, thrashing in the crowd at other band’s gigs, and it turns out that he was, weirdly, a kind of punk-scene celebrity before he even announced himself as a musician.

Beyond MacGowan’s own story (and that of The Pogues), Temple paints a bigger picture, of Ireland’s rich and rebellious history, of punk (of course), and (of course) of drink. You can’t tell MacGowan’s story without talking of booze, and the film is soaked in it, just like MacGowan. He’s simultaneously a sad figure and a weirdly heroic one, defiantly drinking even as he finds it hard to get the glass to his lips. Around him, his friends and family have long ago accepted that he’s a lifer, and they enable him. He’ll die of drink one day, but he hasn’t yet, and that keeps the film’s energy upbeat: MacGowan is a living musician, not a soaking corpse, and here is his worthy celebration.

Oliver Sacks: His Own Life

In Australian cinemas now.

Who knew this man was a swole beast?

* * * *

Oliver Sacks was one of those people who seemed beyond normal capabilities. We may call them geniuses, hyper-intelligent, or, simply, very good at their jobs. But Sacks was very, very good at two jobs: writing and neurology. And that combo made him, weirdly, a star.

As the title makes clear, this is his own story, which is as strange and compelling as many of his case studies. Who knew that beside his incredible talents, he achieved a California State Record in 1961 for squatting? That’s a bodybuilding term for a particular weightlifting manoeuvre, and Sacks won his record by doing it with two hundred and seventy-two kilos on his back. I don’t know about you, but when I read Oliver Sacks, I don’t picture a swole beast.

But this was Sacks: he was full of complications and contradictions, and this elegiac and beautiful movie touches on, I assume, all the biggies. His love and sex life was fascinating; there are addiction issues; he has his own – very Sacksian – neurological deviation; and he was surrounded by a team of Incredibly Smart People who are assembled with Oliver as he discusses his cancer prognosis, the ticking time bomb that frames the film. For this is a movie made about a dying man as he knows he is dying, yet rather than being mournful, it is joyous. Another amazing feat from the life of a truly astonishing individual. Highly recommended.

The Godfather Coda: The Death of Michael Corleone

“Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in!”

* * * *

Made a couple of decades after the ground-breaking first two movies for financial rather than strictly artistic reasons, The Godfather Part Three (1990) was greeted appropriately: everyone acknowledged that it simply wasn’t as good as the first two (it’s not); that Coppola’s daughter Sofia, playing Michael Corleone’s daughter Mary, gave a bad performance (she did); and that the story was both over-complicated and rather unengaging (it was). Some critics went further and accused Coppola, and the film, of tarnishing The Godfather legacy.

A tinkerer – he’s put out multiple ‘director’s cuts’ of Apocalypse Now and recently a re-edited version of The Cotton Club – Coppola has sought to address some of these universally acknowledged issues with his re-cut, restored and re-named The Godfather Coda: The Death of Michael Corleone. He can’t take what’s there and make a silk purse, and the new version remains a pale companion to the glory of the first two masterpieces. But he does restore his daughter’s reputation somewhat, by cutting out a lot of her worst moments, and he definitely streamlines and clarifies the story, mainly by strengthening the structure around Vincent Corleone (Andy Garcia). In this version, Vincent’s introduced earlier, and comes this close to being the protagonist, almost putting Michael in the supporting seat.

Of course, no-one puts Al Pacino, in his greatest role (across the three films), in a corner, and he is superb as the ageing mobster who wants to go straight and find redemption in the eyes of God and his children. But the strengthened focus on Garcia works, driving the narrative more cleanly, and, frankly, Sofia doesn’t come off too badly (though there are still some cringe-worthy line readings). It’s a leaner, cleaner, more comprehensible and watchable version of itself – shorter by thirteen minutes – and worth your time for a re-visit. It looks and feels like The Godfather, and has some sublime moments and a couple of great set-pieces. Like Michael, it seeks redemption. Unlike Michael, it gets some.

BELOW

LaPaglia and Corr.

* * * 1/2

Bold, ambitious, colourful, a big swing, Maziar Lahooti’s feature debut Below, now available on STAN, is full of ideas. Set in the daunting milieu of a migrant detention centre in a (very slightly) alternative-reality Australia, the film takes black-comedy aim at all manner of hot button issues swirling around our – Australian – sense of identity, as well as cancel culture, the dark web, gambling, corporate-speak, privatisation, and, inherently, the ethical and moral quagmire of migrant detention itself. It’s loaded to the brim, thrillingly, bracingly, at times almost gluttonously – the work of someone with a lot to say and only 93 minutes to say it.

Ryan Corr plays Dougie, a young man forced by circumstance to work in a private detention centre in an arid region that’s been effectively erased from Australia – a no-man’s land of no accountability. There, he encounters a punitive system of cage-fighting that’s been set up to keep the detainees in line, and sees an opportunity to profit.

A kind of unholy cross between Catch-22, Fight Club and The Road Warrior, Lahooti’s nihilistic, anti-heroic and at times ferociously angry film is visually energetic and excitingly paced, creating a vibrantly dangerous world with one foot in reality and the other in low-key science fiction. Corr is an entertaining – if amoral – guide, and Anthony LaPaglia is ridiculously enjoyable as Terry, Dougie’s step-father and head honcho at the detention centre who gets him into this mess. As black comedy it’s not the funniest, as political satire it’s not the sharpest, and as sci-fi it’s not the most rigorous, but part of its charm is how it resists trying too hard to excel as any of these. You might say that it’s tonally inconsistent; I would suggest it’s tonally bold. It’s its own thing, original and unique, not for everyone, and all the better for it.